Learning to Speak to Your Mobile Customers as Individuals

Learning to Speak to Your Mobile Customers as Individuals

Let’s get personal. A great majority of marketers are failing to answer the clarion call from consumers to speak to them on a 1:1 basis.

The ramifications are tremendously important.

First, let’s get more specific about the mobile users’ expectations.

Eighty-six percent of consumers say personalization plays a role in their purchasing decisions (Infosys). Four in 10 consumers buy more from retailers who personalize the shopping experience across channels (Monetate).

There are lessons to be learned from those marketers who are getting it right.

“The more the brand or retailer knows about the customer, the better they can serve them,” Jonathan Stephen, a longtime mobile marketer who for three years drove the mobile strategy for JetBlue, told Jeff Hasen for Hasen’s new book called The Art of Mobile Persuasion.

“Some companies tend to not do that so well and cross the line on what’s more disruptive or intrusive than maybe more a passive-type approach. There’s a very fine line there that brands have to be mindful of. It basically comes around to delivering products and services that enhance your customer’s experience.”

One such service is magnificently delivered by one of the major phone carriers. The results of personalized communications with customers has resulted in increased satisfaction scores and decreased churn to the tune of tens of millions of dollars.

The effort by the mobile operator actually begins on day one of a new relationship with a consumer.

Working with a personalization firm in Seattle named Vehicle, the mobile operator delivers a welcome video that is the very first point of communication with a new customer. This personalized touch acknowledges and thanks the subscriber for his or her business and summarizes the details of the account and what to expect when the first bill arrives.

As a result, the company has seen:

  • Significant reduction in churn (customers leaving in the first 30 days)
  • A decrease in calls to customer support
  • The highest recall of any other company touch with the customer (more than 50 percent measured at 90 days post-video delivery)
  • Significant increase in revenue (ARPU, or average revenue per user and lifetime value)
“Personalization wasn’t supposed to be a cleverly veiled way to chase prospects around the web, showing them the same spammy ad for the same lame stuff as everyone else. No, it is a chance to differentiate at a human scale, to use behavior as the most important clue about what people want and more important, what they need.”
— Seth Godin

In any campaign, a critical element for personalization is context. For example, as a brand, it isn’t enough to know if someone is in Times Square. The time of day matters since mobile users have different interests at noon than they do at midnight.

Where context is especially needed is in-app. And that’s where technology can be a mobile marketer’s best friend.

For instance, the Contextual Campaign Manager and Optimizer feature in the FollowAnalytics 1:1 Mobile Marketing platform enables users to create and manage hyper-personalized mobile conversations, including:

  • Push notification
  • In-app and web browser incorporating text
  • Rich data
  • Coupons
  • QR code
  • Geo-fencing and more

Marketers can visualize the customer experience with Optimizer, including funnels and crash incidents. They also can receive recommendations to optimize campaigns.

No less of a marketing authority than Seth Godin wrote on his blog that personalization is often misused. First, Godin’s comments, then we will present you with an opportunity to learn and not repeat the mistakes that he cites.

“Personalization wasn’t supposed to be a cleverly veiled way to chase prospects around the web, showing them the same spammy ad for the same lame stuff as everyone else see,” Godin opined. “No, it is a chance to differentiate at a human scale, to use behavior as the most important clue about what people want and more important, what they need.”